Endocrine Disease Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital

New York Endocrine Disease Center

Established in 2007, the New York Endocrine Disease Center is a section of Columbia University Medical Center, located within the renowned New York Presbyterian Hospital. Six medical endocrinologists, three endocrine surgeons, two nuclear radiologists, four cytopathologists, two ophthalmologists, one genetic counselor, and four nurses make up the staff of the Endocrine Disease Center. The facility treats around 1000 outpatients annually. It is divided into four specialty centers: thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal, and neuroendocrine tumors.

The New York Center for Endocrine Diseases is best known for its New York Thyroid Center, the longest running multidisciplinary thyroid clinic in the US. The Center handles a large variety of thyroid diseases, including hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, thyroid nodules, thyroiditis, thyroid cancer, and multinodular goiters. The center features the Thyroid Biopsy Clinic that uses the latest technology to perform ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration thyroid biopsies with immediate assessment by on-site cytopathologists. This allows for the fastest (often same day) assessment of the risk of cancer in thyroid nodules. The surgeons at the New York Thyroid Center specialize in minimally invasive thyroidectomies (over 350 per year) and use such specialized techniques as local anesthesia and recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring.

The New York Parathyroid Center physicians treat every form of parathyroid disease including cancer, primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism, and tertiary hyperparathyroidism. The New York Parathyroid Center also includes specialists from the world-renowned Metabolic Bone Unit at Columbia University. This Center is one of a few institutions in the country that offer the combination of 4D-CT and nuclear sestamibi scan, the latest and best technology available for parathyroid localization. The center performs both minimally invasive parathyroid surgery and re-operative parathyroid surgery (over 200 per year) with use of intraoperative parathyroid hormone monitoring. In addition, the Center also offers cryopreservation of parathyroid tissue, an important adjunct to help prevent hypoparathyroidism in complex cases.

The New York Adrenal Center is comprised of a team of physicians who specialize in the treatment of complex diseases of the adrenal gland such as Cushing’s and Conn’s syndromes, paraganglioma, pheocromocytoma, adrenal cancer, sex hormone-producing tumors, adrenal incidentaloma, and metastatic disease to the adrenal gland. The center is equipped with advanced diagnostic equipment, including MIBG and PET scanners, and an endovascular facility for adrenal venous sampling. Surgical care is focused on minimally invasive adrenalectomies (including the retroperitoneal approach) to afford patients less pain and a faster recovery. More than 95 percent of the procedures performed in the New York Adrenal Center are minimally invasive.

The New York Neuroendocrine Center treats all neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas, specializing in functional and non-functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The center has the latest diagnostic tools such as CT, MRI, octreotide scanning and interventional endoscopy to help provide the best care to patients, Surgery is focused on minimally invasive approaches, using laparoscopic and robotic technology to allow for faster recovery.

For international patients, translators are available in all languages, and the Center can assist patients in arranging transportation to the nearest airport. The staff also assists in arranging accommodation for patients during their stay in New York, and coordinating with patients’ home embassies.

Country: United States

Address:
161 Fort Washington Ave, 8th Floor, New York, New York 10032 UNITED STATES

Outpatients treated annually: 1,000

Phone: +1 212 305.6969
Email: endocrinesurgery@columbia.edu

Date Founded: 2007

Number of doctors: 14
Number of nurses: 4

Specialties:


Last updated on 5 February 2015